I'm grateful that I can both teach and do research at VU. My students inspire me with their stories and give me a reason to get out of bed every morning.
Elizabeth Verghese
Biomedicine lecturer, researcher

Researcher and lecturer Dr Elizabeth Verghese is changing lives of those around her through her research.

Dr Verghese published some of the first international reports that a hair-like structure present on kidney cells, the cilium, could potentially drive kidney repair in both mouse models of kidney disease, and in human transplant patients with kidney disease. Along with making ground-breaking discoveries, she is passionate about sharing her love of biomedicine through teaching and supervising the next generation of researchers.

"There is no point if you don't love what you do. I'm grateful that I can both teach and do research at VU, especially when I was told early in my career that I couldn't do both and be successful.

Winning the BASF Science and Technology prize at the Victorian Young Achiever Awards meant a great deal in my profession as a teacher and a researcher.

I didn't set out to win any awards, but the recognition will definitely allow me to continue my research into renal cancer and the use of cilium in muscle repair to benefit the people who need it most.

I love teaching more than anything. My students inspire me with their stories and give me a reason to get out of bed every morning.

One reason I wanted to join VU was its unique position to affect change through education."

Position

Researcher and lecturer in Biomedical Sciences

Find out more about biomedicine courses at VU.