Section: Overview
Overview
Key publications
Research funding
Supervising & teaching
Career

Key details

Areas of expertise

  • Exercise physiology
  • Skeletal muscle adaptations to training
  • Molecular biology of exercise
  • Mitochondrial biogenesis
  • Human performance

Available to supervise research students

Available for media queries

About David Bishop

Professor David Bishop is a world leader in muscle exercise physiology with more 250 publications and an h-index of 73. His research has been funded by multiple grants from the ARC, the NHMRC, and the Australian Defence Force, and has received more than 100 invitations to speak at international conferences around the world.

Professor Bishop leads the Skeletal Muscle and Training research group, which has two key research areas: exercise as mitochondrial medicine, and human performance.

The focus of his research group is to examine how diet, exercise, and genes interact to regulate skeletal muscle adaptations, and to translate this new knowledge into recommendations for more individualised exercise prescriptions to better improve health and human performance. His team consists of 4 post-doctoral fellows and 6 PhD students.

Professor Bishop has held many important exercise and sport science leadership positions in Australia. He was the youngest-ever president of Exercise & Sport Science Australia (ESSA). During his presidency, he was lead author on a submission to the Productivity Commission that led to the inclusion of Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) in Medicare-Plus.  He was also invited to the Senate Inquiry into the practice of Sports Science and was a consultant to the Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports. He has twice been on the Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) panel assessing the quality of research in Australia and is currently a director of the Victorian Institute of Sport (VIS).

Professor Bishop has received numerous awards and recognition during this career, where he:

  • was named as one of the “Top 25 Influencers of Exercise & Sport Science in Australia”
  • received the ESSA president’s award for “Service to exercise & sport science in Australia”
  • was awarded the “Young Investigator Award (Biophysical Sciences)” and the “Best Paper” prize at Sports Medicine Australia and Exercise and Sport Science Australia (ESSA) conferences
  • was made a fellow of Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA), the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and the European College of Sports Science (ECSS).

His students have received conference presentation awards at the Exercise and Sport Science Australia and European College of Sports Science (ECSS) meeting. 

He is currently assistant editor of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise (MSSE).

His research program has a significant reach beyond academia, as evidenced by regular requests to translate the importance of his team’s exercise science research findings to the public (> 250 media outputs - print, radio, television). His team’s research concerning mitochondrial adaptations to exercise training has twice been featured on the ABC’s Catalyst program.

Qualifications

  • Ph.D., The University of Queensland, Australia, 1998
  • BHMS (ed) (Honours - 1st Class), The University of Queensland, Australia, 1993

Key publications

Year Citation
2019 Bishop, D. J., Botella, J., Genders, A. J., Lee, M. JC., Saner, N. J., Kuang, J., Yan, X., & Granata, C. (190101). High-intensity exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis: Current controversies and future research directions. Physiology, 34(1), (56-70).

doi: 10.1152/physiol.00038.2018

2018 Fyfe, J. J., Bishop, D. J., Bartlett, J. D., Hanson, E. D., Anderson, M. J., Garnham, A. P., & Stepto, N. K. (181201). Enhanced skeletal muscle ribosome biogenesis, yet attenuated mTORC1 and ribosome biogenesis-related signalling, following short-term concurrent versus single-mode resistance training. Scientific Reports, 8(1),

doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-18887-6

2018 Granata, C., Jamnick, N. A., & Bishop, D. J. (180801). Training-Induced Changes in Mitochondrial Content and Respiratory Function in Human Skeletal Muscle. Sports Medicine, 48(8), (1809-1828).

doi: 10.1007/s40279-018-0936-y

2018 Jamnick, N. A., Botella, J., Pyne, D. B., & Bishop, D. J. (180701). Manipulating graded exercise test variables affects the validity of the lactate threshold and V_ O2peak. PLoS ONE, 13(7),

doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199794

2018 Granata, C., Jamnick, N. A., & Bishop, D. J. (180701). Principles of Exercise Prescription, and How They Influence Exercise-Induced Changes of Transcription Factors and Other Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis. Sports Medicine, 48(7), (1541-1559).

doi: 10.1007/s40279-018-0894-4

2018 Christiansen, D., Murphy, R. M., Bangsbo, J., Stathis, C. G., & Bishop, D. J. (180601). Increased FXYD1 and PGC-1 mRNA after blood flow-restricted running is related to fibre type-specific AMPK signalling and oxidative stress in human muscle. Acta Physiologica, 223(2),

doi: 10.1111/apha.13045

2018 Saner, N. J., Bishop, D. J., & Bartlett, J. D. (180201). Is exercise a viable therapeutic intervention to mitigate mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by sleep loss?. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 37 (60-68).

doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2017.01.001

2017 Granata, C., Oliveira, R. SF., Little, J. P., Renner, K., & Bishop, D. J. (170310). Sprint-interval but not continuous exercise increases PGC-1 protein content and p53 phosphorylation in nuclear fractions of human skeletal muscle. Scientific Reports, 7

doi: 10.1038/srep44227

2016 Mendham, A. E., Duffield, R., Coutts, A. J., Marino, F. E., Boyko, A., McAinch, A. J., & Bishop, D. J. (161201). Similar mitochondrial signaling responses to a single bout of continuous or small-sided-games-based exercise in sedentary men. Journal of Applied Physiology, 121(6), (1326-1334).

doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00289.2016

2016 Granata, C., Oliveira, R. SF., Little, J. P., Renner, K., & Bishop, D. J. (161001). Mitochondrial adaptations to high-volume exercise training are rapidly reversed after a reduction in training volume in human skeletal muscle. FASEB Journal, 30(10), (3413-3423).

doi: 10.1096/fj.201500100R

Research funding for the past 5 years

Please note:

  • Funding is ordered by the year the project commenced and may continue over several years.
  • Funding amounts for contact research are not disclosed to maintain commercial confidentiality.
  • The order of investigators is not indicative of the role they played in the research project.

The Effects of Resistance Training on Hypoxia-Induced Skeletal Muscle Loss in Humans
From: Beijing Sport University
Investigators: Dr Xu Yan
For period: 2018-2019
Not disclosed

Effects of 'Aqui-Live' on blood composition and endurance performance.
From: Natural Aqua Solutions Pty Ltd
For period: 2017-2017
$8,291
Investigating the effects of sports compression garments on aspects of athletic performance, recovery, and adaptations to exercise training.
From: Australian Institute of Sport
Investigators: Dr James Broatch
For period: 2017-2021
$15,000
Physiological and psychophysiological responses to assisted locomotion during load carriage.
From: Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia
Investigators: Prof Rezaul Begg
For period: 2017-2021
Not disclosed
HPRnet - Discovering 'combat genes' to help identify, and optimise the training of, the future soldier.
From: Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia
Investigators: Dr Sarah Voisin, Aspr Nir Eynon
For period: 2017-2022
$576,675

Program in Assistive Technology Innovation (PATI).
From: Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia
Investigators: Prof Rezaul Begg
For period: 2016-2019
Not disclosed
Project Schedule 33: HEAT: Heat effects on adaptations to resistance training.
From: Australian Institute of Sport
Investigators: Dr Jonathan Bartlett, Dr Aaron Petersen, Dr Andre Nelson
For period: 2016-2017
$22,222
PATI - DST Group Research Fellow in Assistive Technology.
From: Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia
Investigators: Prof Rezaul Begg
For period: 2016-2018
$213,625

The influence of a common genetic variant (ACTN3 R577X) on changes in bone remodelling markers and the control of blood glucose following exercise training
From: The Jack Brockhoff Foundation
Investigators: Aspr Nir Eynon, Aspr Itamar Levinger, Dr Xu Yan
For period: 2015-2017
$47,182
Effects of cryotherapy on recovery following resistance training.
From: The Pratt Foundation Grant
Investigators: Dr James Broatch, Dr Aaron Petersen
For period: 2015-2016
Not disclosed
Could impaired mitochondrial function be a cause of the currently unexplained fatigue that accompanies chronic fatigue syndrome?
From: The Judith Jane Mason & Harold Stannett Williams Memorial Foundation
For period: 2015-2016
$79,451

Discovering the role of pH in regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, so as to improve the design of preventative programs aimed at healthy ageing
From: ARC - Discovery
Investigators: Prof Michael Mckenna
For period: 2014-2016
$377,446
The effects of alpha-actinin-3 on muscle metabolism, human health and disease
From: NHMRC (Non-Lead Org)
Investigators: Aspr Nir Eynon
For period: 2014-2016
$10,000

Supervision of research students at VU

Available to supervise research students

Available for media queries

Currently supervised research students at VU

No. of students Study level Role
7 PhD Principal supervisor
5 PhD Associate supervisor
2 Masters by Research Principal supervisor

Currently supervised research students at VU

Students & level Role
PhD (7) Principal supervisor
PhD (5) Associate supervisor
Masters by Research (2) Principal supervisor

Completed supervision of research students at VU

No. of students Study level Role
4 PhD Associate supervisor
5 PhD Principal supervisor

Completed supervision of research students at VU

Students & level Role
PhD (4) Associate supervisor
PhD (5) Principal supervisor

Careers

Details of this Researcher's career are currently unavailable.