Program & speakers AUPEC 2017

Speakers at the Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference 2017 will offer insight into the ‘smart’ grid capable of meeting 21st century economic, security and environmental challenges.

Further speakers and program information will be added as they are confirmed.

Keynote speakers

Professor Saifur Rahman

Director, Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute, USA

Professor Saifur Rahman is the founding director of the Advanced Research Institute at Virginia Tech, USA where he is the Joseph R. Loring professor of electrical and computer engineering. He will present on the Internet of Things Sensor Integration from Smart Buildings to the Smart Grid.

Professor Hirofumi Akagi

Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Hirofumi Akagi, professor and vice dean of the school of engineering at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, is a leading researcher in power conversion systems and their application to industry, utility and transportation.

Kate Summers

Manager Electrical Engineering, Pacific Hydro

Kate has contributed significantly to the national debate on the technical standards and integration of renewable energy both into the market and physically into the NEM grid.

She took up her position at the renewable energy company Pacific Hydro after ten years working in transmission planning and systems operations in the Victorian and later the National Electricity Market Management Company (NEMMCO).

Program overview

Sunday 19 November. RMIT & Melbourne Function Centre. AUPEC 2017 will open on Sunday 19 November, with tutorials at RMIT from 1pm to 5pm, and registration and a welcome reception at the Melbourne Function Centre from 4pm to 8pm.

Monday 20 November, 9am-6pm. Melbourne Function Centre. The first full-day program begins with an opening address from the chair, Professor Akhtar Kalam, and a keynote address from Professor Saifur Rahman on 'IoT Sensor Integration from Smart Buildings to the Smart Grid'. Several presentations will take place during the day, concluding at 5pm with a poster session.

Tuesday 21 November, 9am-5.30pm, conference dinner at 7pm. Melbourne Function Centre. The day will begin with a keynote address by Hirofumi Akagi: 'Trends in Medium-Voltage High-Power Motor Drives'. This will be followed by several other presentations, an ACPE meeting and the API Industry forum.

Wednesday 22 November, 9am-3.30pm. Melbourne Function Centre. The final day of the event begins with a keynote address by renewable-energy expert Kate Summers. After the day's presentations, a closing ceremony will take place at 3.30pm.

Morning and afternoon tea will be provided each day.

Download the AUPEC 2017 program (updated 21 November).

Program day by day

Sunday, 19 November

Time Event

13.00-15.00

Tutorials

Tutorial 1: Recent advances in electrical machines for applications in automotive and renewable energy systems
Tutors
: Prof. Faz Rahman & Dr Rukmi Dutta
Venue: RMIT, 80.09.06 (Building 80, Floor 9, Room 6)

Tutorial 2: Principles & practices of digital current regulation for AC systems
Tutors
: Prof. Grahame Holmes
Venue: RMIT, 80.09.10 (Building 80, Floor 9, Room 10)

15.15-17.00

Tutorial 3: Game Theoretic Analysis of Wholesale Electricity Markets and Australian NEM

Tutor: Prof. Tansu Alpcan
Venue: RMIT, 80.09.10 (Building 80, Floor 9, Room 10)

16:00 - 18:00

Registration

Tennis HQ, Collective Café (level 2, next to the Function Centre)

18:00 - 20:00

Welcome reception & cocktail

Tennis HQ, Collective Café

 

Monday, 20 November

Technical sessions - day one

To find out which papers are presenting on Monday 20 November, download our technical sessions for day one program.

Full-day program

Time Event
08:00 - 09:00

Registration

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

09:00 - 09:30

Opening Session

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

Welcome and housekeeping: Prof Akhtar Kalam, AUPEC 2017

Chair Welcome address: Prof. Warren Payne VU PVC Research

09:30 - 10:30

Keynote address

IoT Sensor Integration from Smart Buildings to the Smart Grid
Professor Saifur Rahman, President, IEEE PES, USA

10:30 – 11:00

Morning Tea

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

11:00 - 12:30

Technical sessions

Session 1: Transactive Energy and Demand management
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 1
10, 33, 52, 82, 103

Session 2: Smart grid, Smart building and Smart city -1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 2
57, 60, 75, 77, 89

Session 3: Microgrid system-1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 3 
7, 27, 31, 39,132

12:30 - 13:30

Lunch

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

13:30 - 15:00

Technical sessions

Session 4: Electricity market -1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 1
12, 14, 22, 65, 88

Session 5: Smart grid, Smart building and Smart city-2
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 2
93, 98, 134, 137, 75

Session 6: Energy storage & Electric vehicle-1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 3
106, 118, 127, 131, 144

15:00 - 15:30

Afternoon Tea

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

15:30 - 17:00

Technical sessions

Session 7: Electricity market -2
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 1
100, 112, 125, 92, 146

Session 8: Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 2
Energy storage & Electric vehicle-2
5, 19, 29, 40, 41

Session 9: Microgrid system-2
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 3
58, 64, 108, 136, 155

16:30 - 18.15

Poster session

Papers along with research and teaching facilities in different Australian Universities
9, 14, 26, 86, 55, 76, 34, 35, 36, 49, 80, 97, 135, 116, 90, 109, 121, 148, 133, 139, 143, 147

18:15 – 19:45

API-ACPE meeting

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room
API and ACPE members only

20:00 onwards

Gazi – API-ACPE dinner

API and ACPE members only

 

Tuesday, 21 November

Technical sessions - day 2

To find out which papers are presenting on Tuesday 21 November, download our technical sessions for day 2 program.

Full-day program

Time Event
08:00 - 09:00

Registration

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

09:00 - 10:00

Keynote address

Trends in Medium-Voltage High-Power Motor Drives
Speaker:
Hirofumi Akagi
Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

10:00 - 10:30

Morning Tea

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

10:30 - 12:30

Technical sessions

Session 10: Wind energy system
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 1 
11, 16, 17, 24, 43, 13

Session 11: Photovoltaic energy system - 1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 2
6, 25, 28, 45, 54, 68, 59

Session 12: Energy storage & Electric vehicle-3
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 3
48, 62, 71, 94, 95, 96, 111

12:30 - 13:30

Lunch/ ACPE meeting

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

13:30 - 15:00

API industry forum

15:00 - 15:30

Afternoon tea

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

15:30 - 18:15

Technical sessions

Session 13: Distributed energy resources
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 1
50, 67, 70, 73, 113, 120, 128, 83

Session 14: Photovoltaic energy system- 2
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 2
78, 81, 91, 105, 123, 126, 142, 150

Session 15: Power Electronics and motor drives
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 3
61, 119, 145, 151, 153,158, 159, 99

19:00 - 22:00

Conference Dinner

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Skyline Room

Awards

Introducing AUPEC 2018

 

Wednesday, 22 November

Technical sessions - day 3

To find out which papers are presenting on Wednesday 22 November, download our technical sessions for day 3 program.

Full-day program

Time Event
09:00 - 10:00

Keynote address

The Power System as the Market comes of Age
Speaker:
Kate Summers
Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

10:00 - 10:30

Morning tea

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

10:30 - 12:30

Technical sessions

Session 16: Power quality, fault diagnosis and protection- 1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 1
87, 63, 122, 138,1 49, 152, 154

Session 17: Power system stability and control -1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 2 
69,102, 107, 11, 124, 130

Session 18: Power system operation and planning – 1
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 3
4, 5, 18, 30, 37, 85,15

12:30 - 13:30

Closing & lunch

Melbourne Park Function Centre – Park Room

13:30 - 15:30

Technical sessions

Session 19: Power quality, fault diagnosis and protection- 2
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 1 
3, 38, 47, 84, 114, 141, 117

Session 20: Power system stability and control -2
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 2 
20, 23, 32, 56,104,139

Session 21: Power system operation and planning – 2
Tennis HQ Level 2 Room 3 
42, 44, 51, 72, 101

15:30 - 16:30

Closing ceremony

 

Presentations & tutorials

Presentation topics

IoT sensor integration from smart buildings to the smart grid

Professor Saifur Rahman, Joseph R. Loring Professor of electrical & computer engineering, Virginia Tech, USA

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings in a connected community.

Such a community or a smart city focuses on advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in schools, libraries, transportation systems, hospitals, power plants, water-supply networks, law enforcement, street lighting, etc.

Sensors need to be deployed in key locations for monitoring and control of ICT devices. A smart city connected to the smart grid relies on widely distributed IoT devices to monitor the urban environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services to improve the quality of urban living. The distributed network of intelligent sensor nodes, as well as data centers/clouds where sensor data are stored and shared, constitutes a smart city infrastructure.

Participatory sensing plays an indispensable role in emerging initiatives of a smart city, which retrieves sensor data from groups of people or communities. Smart cities address urban challenges such as pollution, energy efficiency, security, parking, traffic, transportation, and others by utilizing advanced information and communication technologies (ICT) in data gathering and communications interconnectivity via the Internet.

While there are sensor platforms provided by hardware vendors to monitor and control their own devices, there is no unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. This presentation provides the architecture for such a platform with examples of how this can be deployed for real-time remote monitoring and control of sensors from smart buildings to the smart grid.


Trends in Medium-Voltage High-Power Motor Drives

Professor Hirofumi Akagi, Tokyo Institute of Technology

This talk starts with the present situation of medium-voltage high-power motor drives in a power range up to 100 MW and in a speed rang up to 12,000 min-1 (rpm), along with their new demands from the market. A squirrel-cage induction motor is preferable, especially for high-speed high-power applications because the rotor structure is so simple that the rotor can withstand high-speed rotation. On the other hand, a synchronous motor equipped with a magnetic-field winding in the rotor is suitable for low-speed high-power applications because it requires the so-called “magnetic-field exciter.” The dc current fed by the exciter flows into the magnetic-field winging through either the combination of brushes and slip rings or the so-called “contactless rotating transformer.” In July 2017, the Toshiba Mitsubishi-Electric Industry Corporation (TMEIC) in Japan developed the 18-MW, 8000-rpm two-pole induction motor drives intended for turbo- compressor applications.

Then, Professor Hirofumi will discuss two types of the next-generation medium-voltage high-power motor drives. One is suitable for high-speed high-power applications such as fans, blowers, and turbo compressors with quadratic-torque-to-speed profiles. This is characterized by using a modular multilevel double-star chopper-cell (DSCC) inverter equipped with a distributed dynamic brake. The other is suitable for low-speed high-power applications such as cement-mill drives. This is characterized by using a modular multilevel triple-star bridge-cell (TSBC) converter equipped with a regenerative brake.

Finally, Professor Hirofumi will show three downscaled laboratory systems and their experimental results. The first one is based on a low-speed six-pole induction motor rated at 15 kW and 38 Hz, which is fed by a modular multilevel TSBC converter. The second one is based on a medium-speed four-pole induction motor rated at 15 kW and 50 Hz, which is driven by a modular multilevel DSCC inverter. The last one is based on a high-speed four-pole synchronous motor rated at 10 kW and 300 Hz, which is fed by another modular multilevel DSCC inverter. This replies on a power hardware-in-the-loop-simulation (P-HILS) system consisting of two identical DSCC converters, where one acts as the so-called “inverter under test,” and the other acts as a synchronous motor driving a load with a quadratic-torque-to-speed profile.


The Power System as the Market comes of Age

Kate Summer, Manager Electrical Engineering, Pacific Hydro

Kate will take you on a journey, discovering the power system in a time of market maturity. We'll examine language, media stories, political emphasis and what it takes to be a power system engineer in this period of transition.

Be challenged to find the voice that speaks up for physics when the economic constructs dominate control theory.

Tutorial topics

Principles & practices of digital current regulation for AC systems

Professor Grahame Holmes, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University

Current regulation plays a key role in power electronic conversion systems. The basic concept is to compare a measured current against a defined reference, and to minimise the error between these two quantities by adjusting the switching of the associated power electronic converter. However, while simple in principle, achieving this goal for AC current regulators has proved to be very challenging.

This tutorial will present the current state-of-the-art for digital current regulation of AC converter systems. It will begin by showing how PWM transport and sampling delays are the primary constraints for linear regulators. Strategies to overcome these constraints will then be explored, including backEMF compensation, PR resonant control and its equivalent synchronous d-q frame implementation. An analytical approach to calculate the maximum gains for these strategies will be developed, verified by simulation and matching experimental results. The concepts will then be applied to the more challenging problems of current regulation with an LCL filter, and the influence of common mode EMI filtering on the current regulation process. Finally, some advanced strategies will be presented to manage the nonlinearity caused by inverter saturation to avoid regulation instability.


Recent advances in electrical machines for applications in automotive and renewable energy systems

Professor Faz Rahman & Dr Rukmi Dutta

This tutorial starts with a review of requirements of electric machines for two rapidly emerging areas:

  • automotive applications such as in EV traction, wheel motor, power steering, turbocharger
  • renewable energy conversion such as for conversion of wind, wave/tidal, solar thermal energies.

Recent advances in permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM) structures, such as SPM, Interior PM machines - radial and axial types, with distributed and fractional-slot concentrated-windings (FSCW) with a view to meeting requirements of these applications are brought out. Advantages and limitations of each type are discussed. Design and performance issues of the FSCW PM machine in gearless direct-drive applications as a motor and as a generator are also brought out. Other novel types – Flux switching, PM-assisted SyncRel, Flux-modulating PM machines are also discussed briefly. Issues relating to design/manufacturing/optimisation of PM machines for the two major types of applications and future research directions are brought out. Finally, advances in control techniques of PMSM/G – FOC, DTC, sensorless, model predictive – that are heavily dependent on the structure of a PMSM will also be covered.


Game Theoretic Analysis of Wholesale Electricity Markets and Australian NEM

Professor Tansu Alpcan, The University of Melbourne, Australia & PhD candidate Mr. Amin Masoumzadeh

This tutorial will present a broad overview of classical game-theoretic models for analysing wholesale electricity markets, with a specific focus on recent developments in the Australian power grid and National Electricity Market (NEM). Using the Australian context as a case study, the impact of renewable distributed generation, closure of coal plants, and demand response schemes will be discussed.

The tutorial aims to present fundamental theoretical tools as well as practically-relevant results based on real demand and pricing data, which may be of interest to researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers.


Tutorial slides

Download the tutorial slides from the conference.

Biographies

Keynote speakers biographies

Professor Saifur Rahman

Director, Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute, USA


Professor Saifur Rahman

Professor Saifur Rahman is the founding director of the Advanced Research Institute at Virginia Tech, USA where he is the Joseph R. Loring professor of electrical and computer engineering. He will present on the Internet of Things Sensor Integration from Smart Buildings to the Smart Grid.

Professor Rahman also directs the Center for Energy and the Global Environment. He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE and an IEEE Millennium Medal winner. He is the president-elect of the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) for 2016 and 2017, and will be the president for 2018 and 2019. He was the founding editor-in-chief of the IEEE Electrification Magazine and the IEEE Transactions on Sustainable Energy. In 2006 he served on the IEEE Board of Directors as the vice president for publications.

Professor Rahman is a distinguished lecturer for the IEEE Power & Energy Society and has lectured on renewable energy, energy efficiency, smart grid, electric power system operation and planning  etc in over 30 countries. He served as the chair of the US National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for International Science and Engineering from 2010 to 2013. He has also conducted several energy-efficiency related projects for Duke Energy, Tokyo Electric Power Company, the US Department of Defense, the State of Virginia and the US Department of Energy.

Professor Hirofumi Akagi

Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan


Professor Hirofumi Akagi

Hirofumi Akagi received his Ph. D. degree in electrical engineering from the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, in 1979. Since January 2000, He has been Professor, currently Distinguished Professor, in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Prior to that, he was working for Nagaoka University of Technology as Assistant and then Associate Professor, and Okayama University as Professor. His research interests include power conversion systems and their applications to industry, transportation, and utility. He has authored and coauthored more than 130 IEEE Transactions papers as well as three invited papers in Proceedings of the IEEE.

Dr. Akagi received six IEEE Transactions Prize Paper Awards. He is the recipient of the 2001 IEEE Power Electronics Society William E. Newell Award, the 2004 IEEE Industry Applications Society Outstanding Achievement Award, the 2008 IEEE Richard H. Kaufmann Award (one of the IEEE Technical Filed Awards), and the 2012 IEEE Power & Energy Society Nari Hingorani Custom Power Award. He was elected as an IEEE Fellow in 1996.

Dr. Akagi served as the President of the IEEE Power Electronics Society from January 2007 to December 2008 for two years, and as the IEEE Division II Director from January 2015 to December 2016 for two years.

Kate Summers

Manager Electrical Engineering, Pacific Hydro

Kate holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering (Hons) major in Power and Control Engineering from Swinburne University (Melbourne) and a Graduate Diploma Management. After ten years working in transmission planning (dynamic modelling, power system control) and system operations in the Victorian and later the National Electricity Market Management Company (NEMMCO), she commenced work with the renewable energy company, Pacific Hydro.

In conjunction she has served four years as the technical director for the Australian Wind Energy Association and a further five years as the Chair of the Grid Directorate for the Clean Energy Council. Her work at Pacific Hydro covers a broad range from connection works for new projects, performance and compliance of operating assets including control and protection upgrades for the East Kimberley Power System. Throughout the last twelve years she has contributed significantly to the national debate on the technical standards and integration of renewable energy both into the market and physically into the NEM grid. She combines this a broad practical knowledge of the power system, synchronous generation, wind and solar power plants.

Tutor biographies

Professor Faz Rahman

Professor at the University of New South Wales, Australia

Professor Faz Rahman obtained B.Sc Eng. degree from the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology in 1972 and his M.Sc and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Manchester, U. K., in 1975 and 1978 respectively. He subsequently worked as a Systems Design Engineer in the General Electric Projects Co. at Rugby, UK, for two years and at the National University as a Senior Lecturer for eight years.

Professor Rahman is currently a Professor at the University of New South Wales, Australia. His research interests are in power electronics, motor drives and design of electrical machines with PM excitation. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Dr Rukmi Dutta

Senior lecturer at UNSW, Sydney, Australia

Rukmi Dutta received her Bachelor of Engineering degree in electrical engineering from Assam Engineering College of Guwahati University, India, in 1996 and the PhD degree in electrical engineering from the UNSW Sydney, Australia in 2007. She worked as an Electrical Engineer at CMG Pty Ltd (currently Regal Beloit Australia) and as an associate lecturer at UNSW, Australia. She also worked at Institute of Industrial Science of Tokyo University, Japan and Reliance Industry Ltd, India.

Dr Rukmi Dutta is a senior lecturer at UNSW, Sydney, Australia and a senior member of the IEEE. Her research interests are PM machine design and control, electromagnetic analysis of electric devices, renewable energy and distributed generation.

Tansu Alpcan

Associate Professor & Reader, The University of Melbourne, Australia


Associate Professor Tansu Alpcan

Tansu Alpcan received masters and PhD degrees in electrical and computer engineering from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). His research investigates applications of optimisation and game theory to security and resource allocation problems in smart grid and electricity markets. He chaired or was an Associate Editor, TPC chair, or TPC member of several prestigious workshops and conferences including IEEE Infocom, WiOpt, GameComm, GameNets, GameSec, Rawnet, NetGCoop, IEEE ISGT, IEEE Intl. Conf. on Communications (ICC), Comm. and Inf. Sys. Security Symposium. He is Steering Board member Conference on Decision and Game Theory for Security (GameSec) and was the general chair of the inaugural edition in 2010. He has been a member of IEEE since 1998 and became a Senior Member in 2013. He is currently an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security.

Tansu Alpcan is the (co-)author of more than 150 journal and conference articles as well as the books Network Security: A Decision and Game Theoretic Approach (CUP) and Mechanisms and Games for Dynamic Spectrum Allocation (CUP, 2014). He has worked as a senior research scientist in Deutsche Telekom Laboratories and Technical University Berlin.

Professor Grahame Holmes

Innovation Professor – Smart Energy Systems, RMIT University, Australia

Professor Holmes graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1974, and has a Masters degree in power systems engineering, and a PhD in PWM theory for power converters. For 26 years he was an academic at Monash University, working in the area of Power Electronics, where he established the Power Electronics Research Group to support graduate students and research engineers working together on a mixture of theoretical and practical R&D projects. In 2010, Professor Holmes moved with his group to take up the position of Innovation Professor – Smart Energy Systems at RMIT University, allowing him to broaden his research activities into a diversity of applications of power electronics, including particularly Smart Grids and Smart Energy technologies.

Professor Holmes's research interests include fundamental modulation theory and its application to the operation of energy conversion systems, current regulators for drive systems and PWM rectifiers, active filter systems for the quality of supply improvement, resonant converters, current-source inverters for drive systems, and multilevel converters. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, has published over 250 papers at international conferences and in professional journals, and coauthored a major reference textbook on PWM theory with Prof. Thomas Lipo of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.