Active Living & Public Health honours projects

Honours projects available in the Active Living & Public Health research program are outlined on this page.

The page about applying for an honours program also has information about:

  • eligibility
  • scholarships.

Aquatic & Recreation Centres: Non-User Analysis

Research opportunities exist to explore via qualitative or quantitative methods why some segments of the Australian community do not use Aquatic and Recreation Centres (ARCs).

ARCs are one of the most popular venues for Australians to participate in physical activity. They are increasingly recognised as a setting for understanding community sport and recreation participation. Previous studies, e.g. Tower, McDonald and Stewart (2014) have recognised that a limited segment of the community actually use ARCs and most people, especially lower socio-economic groups, do not use these venues.

Contact

Dr John Towerjohn.tower@vu.edu.au.

Aquatic & Recreation Centres: Community Collaboration

Research opportunities exist to investigate the nature of community partnerships between Aquatic and Recreation Centres (ARCs) and a range of other community groups.

ARCs are one of the most popular venues for Australians to participate in physical activity. Community partnerships are often viewed as a good strategy to encourage participation from diverse sectors of the community but Tower, McDonald & Stewart (2014) found that ARCs are not effectively developing community partnerships.

Contact

Dr John Towerjohn.tower@vu.edu.au.

Aquatic & Recreation Centres: Strategies to Produce Social Capital

Research opportunities exist to explore the nature of social capital in Aquatic and Recreation Centres (ARCs).ARCs are one of the most popular venues for Australians to participate in physical activity. Tower, McDonald and Stewart (2014) found that ARC users involved in group classes and activities had higher levels of social capital than ARC users involved in more individual activities.

Contact

Dr John Towerjohn.tower@vu.edu.au.

Family-based physical activity interventions in early childhood settings

Family-based interventions in early childhood are effective in improving children’s physical activity. However, the acceptability of these interventions, particularly among parents from socio-economically disadvantaged groups, needs to be investigated. This study will investigate the acceptability of family-based physical activity interventions among parents from socially disadvantage groups.

Contact

Melinda Craikemelinda.craike@vu.edu.au.

Physical activity among cancer survivors from socially disadvantaged groups

Physical activity improves cancer outcomes and the quality of life of cancer survivors. However, most cancer survivors do not achieve recommended levels of physical activity, particularly those in socially disadvantaged groups. In this study, we will investigate the factors that are associated with participation in physical activity with a view to designing effective interventions to improve physical activity among these groups.

Contact

Melinda Craikemelinda.craike@vu.edu.au.

Sport & recreation partnerships

Research opportunities exist to investigate how community sport and recreation organisations collaborate with other community groups to form partnerships to encourage sport and recreation participation.

Community partnerships are often viewed as a good strategy to encourage sport and recreation participation for diverse sectors of the community. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of sport and recreation partnerships in local areas.

Contact

Dr John Towerjohn.tower@vu.edu.au.

Strategies used by adults who maintain regular participation in exercise

Most people who commence an exercise program drop out within the first 6 months.

Although there is some knowledge about what motives people to take up exercise, little is known about exercise maintenance and the strategies that are used by people who successfully adhere to regular exercise participation. In this study, we will examine the strategies that people use to maintain their regular participation in exercise.
The findings of the study will provide a better understanding of exercise adherence and will assist in the design of intervention to improve adherence to exercise.

Contact

Melinda Craikemelinda.craike@vu.edu.au.

Further information

More information about applying for an honours, scholarships and supervisors.
General enquiries about the Honours program can be directed to the Honours Coordinator, Senior Lecturer Dr Aaron Petersen.
Email: aaron.Petersen@vu.edu.au